The Power of an image

The Power of an image

At a glance, the image draws you the rear mirror, a baby, and then to the boy running across the street. The complexity of this still is intense yet confusing. Without analysing it, I probably wouldn’t get it either. Being a driver, it is sometimes hard to be safe? I forget how to drive, basically. So it’s nice to have images like this to remind me. The image is distressing and is straight to the point, you need to be careful driving. The signifier is the children, as children are a sensitive topic in present day and highly protected. Yet the signified is the idea of car crashes itself, and the importance of it’s message. The quote reads “The number of car accidents involving children increases during school holidays. Please be extremely careful” yet the image itself entails the message, and provokes emotion of a large range.

The still’s message is purely to be as careful with the children outside the car as you are with the children inside the car. Although this is the pin point message, the image can also be interpreted in other ways. For example, the illegal use of phones in the car or the distractions of maps. The connotation of advertising safety on roads and protection of children, as well as the denotation of children and oblivious drivers displays a very real image of a common, unfortunate scene. The meaning behind this is relevant, complex and controversial. The characters and positioning is confronting, gaining the immediate attention of the audience and the detailed negligence off a parties in the image creates a baffling response of any receiver. To me, this image is startling, as a new drive, on my green p’s, driving is extremely intimidating and it seems as the months go on, there is more and more danger entailed.

On average, 3 people a day are killed on the roads in Australia, these statistics increasing over school holidays. The chosen image erupts a different range of emotion, anxiety, upset, grief, guilt, all implemented in hopes of gaining one strong reaction from the creator, the need for change.

The advertisement of this still is to decrease children related accidents by making the reader’s response personal, any family based responder is predicted to gain awareness on the roads and change the perspective of the way they drive.

Until next time,

Jules x

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Being part of an Audience

Being part of an Audience

For me, an audience is at it’s prime when gathered in a mosh pit, screaming the lyrics of my favourite song along with thousands of other people all in one place. Last year I attended ‘Groovin’ in Maitland, where I stood at the front of a mosh pit for 6 hours, pressed against a fence, just so I could hear Aminé (an artist who has only one song that I really, actually kind of know) sing “Bad thang, fine as hell, thick as-“. 6 hours just to hear those sweet words. He eventually did and then I had to stand through his other 12 songs that I had never heard in my life but I still managed to mumble along, pretending that I knew every single lyric.

thankyou seccy for the great pic x

Aside from being incoherent, the experience was undeniably one of the best I’ve had in my life so far. The audience in this case brought inclusiveness, as we listened to some of our favourite bands, we were all one.

Audiences however in 2019 are mostly digitalised through voicing our opinions on twitter to binging on Netflix. This has has removed some of the collectiveness of joining together like  in a cinema or watching l lectures online (can’t say I don’t do this).. and it kind of sucks.

From my experience at Groovin, real life, in person audiences are the greatest types of audiences to be part of, and that’s what I really took away from it. I got to meet some extremely wacky but amazing people and was immersed in a new culture of music I’ve never witnessed before.

From my experience at Groovin, real life, in person audiences are the greatest types of audiences to be part of, and that’s what I really took away from it. I got to meet some extremely wacky but amazing people and was immersed in a new culture of music I’ve never witnessed before.

 The only negatives… desperately needing to use the toilet at the front of a contained mosh pit when your favourite DJ is only minutes from entering the stage and having every part of your body touching every single part of someone else’s body (who happened to be a stranger) pushed up against your back. This doesn’t help when you are merely 5 foot tall and I am not exaggerating when I say it was EVERY part of their body pushed up against me. Side note, the feeling of getting pushed against a fence isn’t always fun and lead to my friends and I, holding on the fence occasionally and screaming very loud to let out our frustration. I love being part of a audience… I swear that wasn’t sarcasm.

Until next time,

Jules x