BCM206 Contextual Essay

BCM206 Contextual Essay

Project Summary:

Throughout this semester in BCM206, I have curated content on ‘TikTok’, a popular social media platform that allows you to produce short videos following trends and popular sounds. I had previously made videos on this platform for BCM112 and BCM114. I wanted to make more videos after previous success on the application when I reached around 400k views on one of my videos. Based off my research and previous experience, taking part in trends and using viral sounds as early as possible can aid in getting maximum views and likes, with this information I tried my upmost effort to catch trends early yet also incorporate my own interpretation of the trend.

I made an audience starter pack in order to lay out what I expect from viewers. I decided I would post around 3-4 videos each couple of days, tracking my views, likes and followers. With an established 7000 followers, I hoped I would have them boost my engagement and share the videos around. Due to the large growth on TikTok, as I prerequisite I researched how many people had downloaded the application since I last did a digital artefact. Oberlo stated that over 100 million users had downloaded the application since May 2020.

Learning Moments:

The subject’s topics of anonymous resistance and digital feudalism strung true with my digital artefact. With a viral application such as TikTok, comes trolls, hacks and insensitivity as we learnt in anonymous resistance. As I learnt this, I contributed it to my work, making sure it was censored and remaining respectful to avoid backlash. Digital feudalism remained coherent in my digital artefact as well, the algorithm of TikTok being a large part of short-lived success. TikTok according to Later, the algorithm of TikTok relies on the amount of followers one has and how the engagement is preceded.

One learning moment that strung true for me was the beginning of my digital artefact when I first posted. I used an audio with moderate amount of views and users, the videos received over 42k views and 9000 likes. Little did I know, the timing of when I posted my video and the sound I used. Each were both effective in my engagement. I learnt timing is everything when comes to posting on any social media platform, due to the average amount of people online at any time. The Influencer Marketing Hub stated that the best times to post on TikTok (EST) where on average 6am, 10am, 4pm and 10pm.

The most important learn I gained from this subject was likelihood. Due to my viral content in other subjects, I became overconfident in this subject, expecting some (if not all) my videos to go viral and I would somehow become and influencer overnight. For obvious reasons, this didn’t happen. Oberlo stated that out of the 800 million users on the application, 41% are aged between 16 and 21. The average user opens TikTok at least 9 to 10 times a day and spends around 52 minutes on the app per time. With these statistics, my goals became more realistic and I changed my plan to do videos for myself and my own enjoyment rather than for others.

Checkout my Tiktok! (DA):

https://www.tiktok.com/@juliajanejohnson?lang=en

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Week 11: The internet of things: from networked objects to anticipatory spaces

Week 11: The internet of things: from networked objects to anticipatory spaces

The final week of BCM206, wow. This week we learnt about IoT devices, and the future of daily life in accordance to advices. The progression of electrical devices is advanced upon its years, we now have ability to ask them to do what we command or track where we are. A journal by Nicola Rua called “Secure communication for smart IoT objects” studies the extent of advancement in technology. According to this reading, IoT objects have the ability to change our daily routine, activities and behaviours. As this type of technology begins to further adapt, our individual environments are bound to change rapidly, whether this is easing daily life or becoming more invasive to our private life. The adaptation of such devices brings the desired future of technology, yet it holds the question of when it can be taken too far.

reference: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/260542525_Secure_communication_for_smart_IoT_objects_Protocol_stacks_use_cases_and_practical_examples

Week 10: Dark fiber: exploits, botnets and cyberwar

Week 10: Dark fiber: exploits, botnets and cyberwar

Over the past couple of weeks, the topics we have studied in BCM206 closely correlate. This week we studied the use of fake identities, specifically in the US military. The use of fake identities is commonly found online, its notoriously known as “Catfishing”. The concept is so popular (yet uncomforting) that there was an American reality tv show made on the concept called “catfish” (obviously). In an article by Vulture called “Here’s how MTV’s catfish works”, the journalist studied the way catfishing effects an individual. Catfishing is not only a danger, but a mental mind game. ‘Catfishes’, as they’ve been nicknamed, prey on vulnerable people online leading them to believe they are someone else, scamming money at of them and/or leading them into a fake relationship online. These cases tend to become a large scaled and long length scams.

reference: https://www.vulture.com/2014/05/catfish-mtv-casting-production-process.html

Week 9: Anonymous resistance: hackers, lulz and whistle-blowers

Week 9: Anonymous resistance: hackers, lulz and whistle-blowers

The internet can notoriously be known as a dangerous place. Any personal information can be exposed to nearly anyone with the power to use invasive technology to find your personal details and use them against you. I found an interesting reading called “hacker, hoaxer, whistle-blower, spy”. The journal examines the many evils of the online community, within its first chapter, it studies the online group of hackers called “anonymous”. The group became an online sensation in 2008, that also scared millions of people globally. They first targeted an American news company for their lack of judgement, exposing hacked details from the company to expose them. Over the year since, the group has cemented its place online and is both feared and respected. The internet continues to not be a thoroughly safe or kind space and has many loopholes, it is always important to protect your information with protective software to protect your information.

reference:

Week 8: Networked insurgencies: social media revolutions and meme warfare

Week 8: Networked insurgencies: social media revolutions and meme warfare

Social Media, from the dawn of its creation, has always been used as a source of activism and campaigning. Online platforms ignite far larger amounts of attentions and can attract global participation. Examples of social media being used in this light is the recent and current “black live matter” movement and the Me-Too movement. Along with campaigning, ‘Memes’ are guaranteed and have been weaponised to incite further attention. Technology review studied the weaponisation of memes. Through an example, the author identified how any photo posted online can be doctored to be whatever the creator desires, essentially becoming a meme. In these social media movement, memes are spread across social media platforms to further spread messages and often can be encrypted or even false. The only doubt in social media is the blurred line of what is real and can be trusted and what is fake.

reference:

https://www.technologyreview.com/2019/10/24/132228/political-war-memes-disinformation/

Week 7: Feudalism 2.0: living in the information stack

Week 7: Feudalism 2.0: living in the information stack

This week we discussed the practices in place online and how this affects us as digital user of content individually. During this topic, I found an article by ‘web strategist’ about digital feudalism and how there is essentially an online hierarchy. Creatively, it links back to medieval times to explain the similarities in online feudalism. Any digital creator who has made online content has unwillingly agreed to terms and conditions on the ownership of this content and will essentially never wreak the full benefits (whether this is minor or extreme) of their own content. The online hierarchy allows large investors and owners to overrule digital content and have some form of ownership of anything, to a certain extent, on a chosen platform. For example, creators on YouTube who make videos, do not fully own the content they have made, YouTube itself has a certain amount of claim on these videos.

reference:

Week 6: The Attention Economy and long tail effect

Week 6: The Attention Economy and long tail effect

The long tail effect was discussed by Chris Anderson in 2015 described as a statistical term for online marketing. The 2020 article “Understanding the long tail theory media fragmentation and niche marketing” provides further information on this week’s topic, expanding on the theory of unlimited space online for large and small companies to influence. According to this reference, Amazon overtook Walmart in 2019 as the most powerful retailer globally due to online marketing, proving Chris Anderson’s theory of unlimited digital influence and online shelf space. The long tail effect is at a constant battle, the positives being the mote attention an online platform provides and the larger productions whereas the negatives include the lack of staff required and the uphill battle of having desired attention online due to this unlimited amount of shelf space and the millions of companies online.

reference:

https://www.ideagrove.com/blog/understanding-the-long-tail-theory-of-media-fragmentation

Week 2: A global nervous system – from the telegraph to cyberspace

Week 2: A global nervous system – from the telegraph to cyberspace

Stranded in Europe, I don’t feel like a displaced person. I’m buoyed by an invisible network of friends and strangers all connected by social media.

By Micah L. Sefry

Just when I thought BCM112 had complicated weekly topics! This week we discussed the development of globally integrated information networks and their role in the formation of the network society. The formation of information networks allows us to communicate globally. I found a great article surrounding the global nervous system, the article addresses that even in the most alone states such as being deployed in the army, you are never truly alone. With Skype, Twitter, Facebook etc. the world is constantly connected. We all have the ability to contact each other from opposite sides of the world as well as allowing us to meet new people from different countries. My remediation below shows how you can be alone, but on the other side of your phone you could be interacting with over 600 people or more. The network society is only growing larger, allowing communications to widen and spread.

The Nation. 2020. The Global Nervous System. [online] Available at: <https://www.thenation.com/article/archive/global-nervous-system/&gt; [Accessed 7 August 2020].

Week 3: Civilisation of the mind – understanding the network society paradigm

Week 3: Civilisation of the mind – understanding the network society paradigm

 

The network society paradigm is complex yet adapts to any context. The network society is known as a free space and platform with no political control. In this week’s reading of “The declaration of the independence of cyberspace” by John Perry Barlow, he discusses the implications of the network society, his article talking directly to the industrial world and government. He quotes “You are not welcome among us. You have no sovereignty where we gather. We have no elected government, nor are we likely to have one” declaring that cyberspace will always be a space that has political fluidity and hence no surveillance or control by governments. The continuous pattern online allows people to talk openly and express opinion, which has dated back since the beginning of the internet and computers. Yet, throughout at America, China and likely other countries, governments have taken control of the digital world contradicting the suggested reading. Many even believe pigeons are actually government drones that surveillance us…  what  a silly theory.

this week’s remediation:

Electronic Frontier Foundation. 2020. A Declaration Of The Independence Of Cyberspace. [online] Available at: <https://www.eff.org/cyberspace-independence&gt; [Accessed 13 August 2020].

Week 4: The chronic task of sorting – information flows and liquid labour

Week 4: The chronic task of sorting – information flows and liquid labour

This week’s topic is coherent with everything going on globally around the world, and it always will be. The idea of have media is sorted into its historical context interests me, how online presence meshes and fits into present time. An example of this is the ‘BLM’ movement. There is much controversy of over media’s support towards this movement, influencers being believed to use the movement online to self promote themselves, as well as companies and brands. An example of a company support the Black lives matter movement is H&M a popular clothing brand who donated $500K and quoted “let’s change”. Many people speculate whether it is self promotion when tis comes to these charitable brands, yet it is still up to debate. The subversion of media almost makes a meme like environment online, contradicting the flow of information online.

“Industrial work is set to the rhythm of the machine, while knowledge work is set to the flow of information” (Mitew 2012).

This week’s remedition:

Ray Nguyen. 2020. Liquid Labour: A Bless Or A Curse Of Information Technology?. [online] Available at: <https://ray2401.wordpress.com/2017/08/15/liquid-labour-a-bless-or-a-curse-of-information-technology/ [Accessed 28 August 2020].

Livingston, M., 2020. These Are The Brands Giving Money To The Black Lives Matter Movement. [online] CNET. Available at: <https://www.cnet.com/how-to/companies-donating-black-lives-matter/&gt; [Accessed 28 August 2020].